Wednesday, January 10, 2018

What a $4,000 Treadmill Means for the Future of Gadgets - The New York Times

One of many comments on the article: "I wish someone made bikes that could be ridden outside. Wait. What?"
"In an industry dominated by smartphone apps, cloud services and cheap knockoffs, hardware companies have had a hard time getting traction. But Peloton said it did nearly $400 million in sales last year, up from about $170 million in 2016, and said it planned to reach profitability this year. It’s done all this on the strength of a singular insight: The gadget itself isn’t as important as the service. 
Peloton does not sell just a simple piece of hardware. Instead, the company spent tens of millions of dollars creating an inviting experience, complete with brand-ambassador celebrities and high-end retail locations. At the core of its business is a beguiling online service: Get on the bike, turn on the screen, and you are instantly connected with live fitness classes tailored to your preferences and athletic abilities. It’s like having a personal trainer who comes to your house whenever you like."
What a $4,000 Treadmill Means for the Future of Gadgets - The New York Times
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