Wednesday, August 01, 2018

Ancestry, 23andMe and others say they will follow these rules when giving DNA data to businesses or police -- The Washington Post

Later in the article: ""I don't think the average consumer has wrapped their head around the range of issues they should think about when they make a decision to share [DNA] data,” [Jules Polonetsky, the leader of the Future of Privacy Forum] added."
"Under the new guidelines, the companies said they would obtain consumers' “separate express consent” before turning over their individual genetic information to businesses and other third parties, including insurers. They also said they would disclose the number of law-enforcement requests they receive each year.

The new commitments come roughly three months after local investigators used a DNA-comparison service to track down a man police believed to be the Golden State Killer, who allegedly raped and killed dozens of women in California in the 1970s and 1980s. Investigators identified the suspect using a decades-old DNA sample obtained from the crime scene, which they uploaded to GEDmatch, a crowdsourced database of roughly a million distinct DNA sets shared by volunteers."
Ancestry, 23andMe and others say they will follow these rules when giving DNA data to businesses or police -- The Washington Post
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