Tuesday, February 20, 2007

Flame First, Think Later: New Clues to E-Mail Misbehavior - New York Times

Interesting snapshot: 

Flaming has a technical name, the “online disinhibition effect,” which psychologists apply to the many ways people behave with less restraint in cyberspace.

[...]

This work points to a design flaw inherent in the interface between the brain’s social circuitry and the online world. In face-to-face interaction, the brain reads a continual cascade of emotional signs and social cues, instantaneously using them to guide our next move so that the encounter goes well. Much of this social guidance occurs in circuitry centered on the orbitofrontal cortex, a center for empathy. This cortex uses that social scan to help make sure that what we do next will keep the interaction on track.

Source: Flame First, Think Later: New Clues to E-Mail Misbehavior - New York Times

Post a Comment