Tuesday, May 04, 2010

OneNote: The best-kept secret in Microsoft Office 2010 - The Microsoft Office Blog - The Microsoft Office Blog

A brief overview of OneNote 2010

With OneNote 2010 plus the new OneNote Web App, you’ll be able to break down physical location barriers and use the information in your notebooks from a single location on the Web and access it from virtually anywhere. If you want to share information with others, you can set up and use a shared notebook to sync updates from multiple sources and contributors. There’s no worrying about saving and overwriting files because OneNote automatically manages shared notebooks for you.

OneNote doesn’t make you think about the technology you’re using. It lets you think about the things in your head, so you can spend time organizing and acting on those things. Unlike a word processor that forces you to think in lines of text, or a spreadsheet that sees everything as a grid of cells, OneNote pages have the same flexibility as paper, but with many more benefits. You can jot down and drop stuff on a page anywhere you want. But, unlike real paper, information in OneNote is never stuck once it’s written or pasted there. You can freely move everything around later on, either to make more space and put things in order, or to organize information by subject, by projects, or anything else you want. Best of all, to recall anything you’ve put into OneNote, you can use instant search to retrieve items in their original context to the projects, date, and people they belong, no matter if it’s text, handwriting, pictures, audio clips, videos, or computer files.

OneNote: The best-kept secret in Microsoft Office 2010 - The Microsoft Office Blog - The Microsoft Office Blog

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