Thursday, February 18, 2016

Why Apple’s Tim Cook shouldn’t crack the iPhone for the FBI - The Boston Globe

Also see Google CEO Pichai Lends Apple Support on Encryption (WSJ), Apple’s Principled Stand (Tech.pinions), and Apple’s Stance Highlights a More Confrontational Tech Industry (NYT), which notes "But if the confrontation has crystallized in this latest battle, it may already be heading toward a predictable conclusion: In the long run, the tech companies are destined to emerge victorious."
"If Pym’s order stands, every US tech company is one court order away from sacrificing its customers’ privacy. American firms could lose billions in sales as consumers worldwide seek out alternative products from companies that US courts can’t touch. The popular secret-message program Telegram, for example, comes from Germany; the file encryption software maker Silent Circle is based in Switzerland. Good luck with those subpoenas.

The files on Farook’s phone may or may not contain valuable evidence. But the phone has already told investigators who Farook called and when, as well as the Internet sites he visited. That data, which could identify other terrorists, is on file, unencrypted, at the phone company, available to any police officer with a court order."
Why Apple’s Tim Cook shouldn’t crack the iPhone for the FBI - The Boston Globe
Post a Comment