Wednesday, May 07, 2008

Annals of Innovation: In the Air: Reporting & Essays: The New Yorker

Fascinating Malcolm Gladwell article from the latest issue of The New Yorker; read the whole thing

In 1999, when Nathan Myhrvold left Microsoft and struck out on his own, he set himself an unusual goal. He wanted to see whether the kind of insight that leads to invention could be engineered. He formed a company called Intellectual Ventures. He raised hundreds of millions of dollars. He hired the smartest people he knew. It was not a venture-capital firm. Venture capitalists fund insights—that is, they let the magical process that generates new ideas take its course, and then they jump in. Myhrvold wanted to make insights—to come up with ideas, patent them, and then license them to interested companies. He thought that if he brought lots of very clever people together he could reconstruct that moment by the Grand River.

Annals of Innovation: In the Air: Reporting & Essays: The New Yorker

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