Saturday, July 31, 2010

Book Review - Long for This World - The Strange Science of Immortality - By Jonathan Weiner - NYTimes.com

And that cheery analogy is before Social Security benefits get cut

“This is a good time to be a mortal,” Weiner writes, noting that life expectancy in the developed world is about 80 years, and improving. Yet evolution has equipped us with bodies and instincts designed only to get us to a reproductive age and not beyond. “We get old because our ancestors died young,” Weiner writes. “We get old because old age had so little weight in the scales of evolution; because there were never enough Old Ones around to count for much in the scales.” The first half of life is orderly, a miracle of “detailed harmonious unfolding” beginning with the embryo. What comes after our reproductive years is “more like the random crumpling of what had been neatly folded origami, or the erosion of stone. The withering of the roses in the bowl is as drunken and disorderly as their blossoming was regular and precise.”

Book Review - Long for This World - The Strange Science of Immortality - By Jonathan Weiner - NYTimes.com

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