Showing posts with label Google Books. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Google Books. Show all posts

Wednesday, March 07, 2012

Google’s store now a one-stop shop - Business - The Boston Globe

Google is moving fast with this; Google Books and Android Market both updated themselves to Google Play on my smartphone this morning

Google is trying to establish a one-stop shop that can satisfy everyone’s digital desires, whether they are on a mobile device or a desktop computer’s Web browser. The effort is part of the Internet search leader’s broader ambition to diversify beyond online advertising, which accounts for 96 percent of its revenue.

With Google Play, the company hopes more people will start noticing other types of content and consider buying an electronic book or album, too. If that happens, Google Inc. believes more digital content providers will want to peddle their wares in its store.

Google’s store now a one-stop shop - Business - The Boston Globe

Wednesday, January 25, 2012

Subtext iPad App Makes Readers' Thoughts an Open Book - Katherine Boehret - The Digital Solution - AllThingsD

See the full review for more details about a social reading app for Google Books on the iPad

Like Amazon’s Kindle already does, Subtext gives anyone who reads an e-book the ability to make notes, highlight passages and to keep private or share those notes or highlights with other users. But this app goes much further: It also lets readers post questions, polls, quizzes or even Web links that are noted in the margins of the book. Other users respond to these posts and start mini book discussions that can continue indefinitely. Subtext content can be kept private, made visible to all users or made visible only to a user’s friends. Along with comments from fellow readers, Subtext users can see comments marked in blue that are made by a book’s author or other experts.

Subtext iPad App Makes Readers' Thoughts an Open Book - Katherine Boehret - The Digital Solution - AllThingsD

Monday, July 25, 2011

WSJ, Kobo falling in line in Apple’s App Store, Google Books is out | 9to5Mac | Apple Intelligence

Check the post link below for speculation about Google Books being pulled for violating the Apple App Store policy

The WSJ is reporting that Apple is laying down the law on apps that try to link externally to other payment systems in the App Store.  The WSJ’s own app and Kobo, another eBookseller were both forced to remove external links to payment stems from within their apps.

In a pair of moves that suggest Apple Inc. is enforcing rules for selling content on its devices, Kobo Inc., the Canadian e-book retailer, and The Wall Street Journal said Sunday they will no longer sell content directly to customers through their apps for Apple devices.

WSJ, Kobo falling in line in Apple’s App Store, Google Books is out | 9to5Mac | Apple Intelligence

Tuesday, July 19, 2011

AFP: Judge grants more time to ink Google Books pact

It’s an outlier scenario, but I continue to believe an Amazon/Google deal for books, Android devices, and other domains would be very timely

US District Court Judge Denny Chin set a new hearing date for September 15 in protracted negotiations which, if unsuccessful, will leave it to him to decide how to proceed.

"We have been working closely with the authors and publishers to explore a number of options in response to the court's decision," Google said in response to an AFP inquiry.

"Regardless of the outcome, we'll continue to make books discoverable and useful through Google Books and Google eBooks," the California Internet firm added.

AFP: Judge grants more time to ink Google Books pact

Sunday, June 12, 2011

Inside Google Books: Doodle in the Google eBooks Web Reader

Making at least some of the world’s information accessible and useful with virtual crayons

As the young (and young at heart) know, books aren't simply meant to be read - sometimes they're meant to be marked up, colored in and scribbled all over. Up until now, however, you couldn't really do that with digital books. Today, we're introducing Doodle Mode for a select group of Google eBooks. Take a virtual crayon to these digital books and go wild: draw pictures and diagrams, connect the dots, or underline words.
To get started, select any of ebooks, available for purchase, in the list below from "The Everything Kids'" series, which is the first line of ebooks to have Doodle Mode. Open them in the Google eBooks Web Reader. The Web Reader works in all modern browsers and lets you read Google eBooks without having to download them. (Note, however, that Doodle Mode does not yet work with Internet Explorer browsers.)

[…]

image

[…]

Doodles aren't saved, so you're free to doodle again and again on the pages of the ebooks without having to worry about using them up. (But if you do create a particularly stunning doodle, be sure to take a picture or a screenshot.)

Inside Google Books: Doodle in the Google eBooks Web Reader

Monday, April 04, 2011

The Google Books Settlement, R.I.P. | James Gleick

Another perspective on Google Books

Many people, including some I greatly respect, are gleeful about the demise of the arduously worked out settlement of the lawsuits brought by the Authors Guild and book publishers against Google. Not me.

It certainly wasn’t perfect. It involved some messy compromises, as settlements tend to do. It couldn’t satisfy everyone.

[…]

We’re back to a messy real world now. Perhaps the stars are finally aligned for Congress to create a National Digital Library, assembling and preserving all these books, making them searchable, and sharing them with readers in a way that fairly compensates the rightsholders. This Congress seems pretty dysfunctional, but who knows? The settlement, now defunct, at least provides a well thought-out framework for how it might be done—with or without Google.

The Google Books Settlement, R.I.P. | James Gleick

Monday, March 28, 2011

Six Reasons Google Books Failed by Robert Darnton | NYRBlog | The New York Review of Books

Check the article link below for a succinct summary by domain expert Robert Darnton; he analyzes what went wrong for Google Books and describes a Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) alternative

Judge Denny Chin’s opinion in rejecting the settlement between Google and the authors and publishers who sued it for infringement of their copyrights can be read as both as a map of wrong turns taken in the past and as an invitation to design a better route into the digital future. Extrapolating from the dense, 48-page text that accompanied the judge’s March 23 decision, it is possible to locate six crucial points where things went awry:

Six Reasons Google Books Failed by Robert Darnton | NYRBlog | The New York Review of Books

Saturday, March 26, 2011

The Book Deal May Be Dead, But Google Is Still Right: Tech News and Analysis « [GigaOM]

Check the article link below, and the comment thread therein, for a lively debate

The Google book settlement — which the search giant signed with the Authors Guild and the Association of American Publishers in 2008, after a dispute over the company’s scanning of books — was struck down by a judge this week as too far-reaching, which is arguably true (although Google would undoubtedly disagree). But the fact that the arrangement has been rejected might not be such a bad thing, because it puts the spotlight back where it should be: on the fact that Google is doing nothing wrong — legally or morally — in scanning books without the permission of the authors or the publishers of those books.

The Book Deal May Be Dead, But Google Is Still Right: Tech News and Analysis «

Thursday, March 24, 2011

Google’s Next Stop May Be in Congress - NYTimes.com

Only a matter of time…

Instead, Google may take the battle from the courtroom to Congress, to promote a law that would make orphan works — books that are still under copyright but whose author or copyright owner can’t be found — widely available.

“The publishers have said, ‘We want to settle,’ but Google’s motivation to settle is quite a bit lower,” said Pamela Samuelson, an expert in digital copyright law at the University of California, Berkeley, who has opposed the settlement. Still, she said, Google, which has already scanned 15 million books, is unlikely to give up. “The next thing to do is think about going to Congress and getting legislation that would make particularly orphan works available to the public,” she said.

Google’s Next Stop May Be in Congress - NYTimes.com

Wednesday, March 23, 2011

Judge Rejects Google Books Settlement - WSJ.com

More on the rejected settlement

James Grimmelmann, an associate professor at New York Law School, said that the judge is clearly hinting that he would seriously consider approving the settlement if it is revised in a way that allows publishers and authors the right to opt into the settlement before Google can sell their works.

Mr. Grimmelmann said that the settlement basically consists of two parts: payment for what Google has done in the past, and the creation of an ambitious bookstore program to sell mostly out-of-print books. "If the parties can agree on an opt-in arrangement, it will give authors and publishers one more option for selling their works. This is pretty much how copyright works today," he said.

Judge Rejects Google Books Settlement - WSJ.com

US judge rejects Google’s settlement with publishers - The Boston Globe

Back to the drawing board

US Circuit Judge Denny Chin said the creation of a universal library would “simply go too far,’’ and he was troubled by differences between Google’s views and those of everyone affected by the settlement. Still, he left the door open for a deal, noting that many objectors would drop their complaints if Google Inc., the Internet search leader, lets book owners choose to join the library, rather than force them to opt out.

US judge rejects Google’s settlement with publishers - The Boston Globe

Thursday, January 13, 2011

Google Acquires eBook Technologies [TechCrunch]

If at first you don’t succeed, buy, buy again

So what exactly is eBook Technologies? Details on the homepage are scant — the site just has a banner that says, “eBook Technologies supplies a family of intelligent reading devices and licenses technologies that enable automated publishing and control over content distribution.” Most links on the site, including the Product page, just redirect to this homepage. However, a little digging through Google’s Cache reveals more details.

Google Acquires eBook Technologies

Friday, December 17, 2010

We Are the Words - Technology Review

More details

Lieberman Aiden and Jean-Baptiste Michel, both at Harvard's Program for Evolutionary Dynamics, led the project, which they've dubbed "culturomics"—a portmanteau combining "culture" and "genomics." The first fruit of their labors was a mammoth database of the words in about 5.2 million books published between 1800 and 2000—roughly four percent of all published books. These came from the Google Books project, whose library contains 15 million books.

In today's issue of the journal Science, the researchers introduce their project along with some of the first results they've derived from the data. In connection with the publication, Google is rolling out an application (at www.culturomics.org) that allows anyone to access and analyze the finished database, which includes 2 billion words and phrases.

We Are the Words  - Technology Review

Google's Word-Wide Web Launches - WSJ.com

More details

"It is just stunning," said noted cultural historian Robert Darnton, director of the Harvard University Library, who wasn't involved in the project and who has been critical of Google's effort to digitize the world's books. "They've come up with something that is going to make an enormous difference in our understanding of history and literature."

All told, about 129 million books have been published since the invention of the printing press. In 2004, Google software engineers began making electronic copies of them, and have about 15 million so far, comprising more than two trillion words in 400 languages.

Google's Word-Wide Web Launches - WSJ.com

Harvard, Google join in study of books from past 200 years - The Boston Globe

The search for terrestrial intelligence continues…

Books already tell stories, but when their words are combined and analyzed with computational tools, they tell bigger tales. By studying billions of words that appeared in books published over the last 200 years, the researchers found that references to God have been dropping off since about 1830. People are becoming celebrities earlier in life now than in the past, but their fame is more fleeting as their names drop out of the lexicon. References to past years are dropping off more quickly as cultures shift their focus to the present. And censorship leads to discernible shifts in a person’s or event’s cultural footprint, as evident in tracking Tiananmen in Chinese books, or the Jewish artist Marc Chagall in German books from the Nazi era.

Harvard, Google join in study of books from past 200 years - The Boston Globe

Wednesday, December 01, 2010

Google Set to Launch E-Book Venture - WSJ.com

Perhaps poised to be pivotal to the success of Android tablet devices

Google Inc. is in the final stages of launching its long-awaited e-book retailing venture, Google Editions, a move that could shake up the way digital books are sold.

The long-delayed venture—Google executives had said they hoped to launch this summer—recently has cleared several technical and legal hurdles, people close to the company say. It is set to debut in the U.S. by the end of the year and internationally in the first quarter of next year, said Scott Dougall, a Google product management director.

[…]

The e-books store is an extension of Google's ambitious—and sometimes controversial—plan to scan the world's 150 million or so books and make them accessible to users of Google's Web-search engine. Thanks to several book-scanning centers located near major libraries, Google executives say the project, dubbed Google Books, is 10% complete.

Google Set to Launch E-Book Venture - WSJ.com

Wednesday, November 03, 2010

Inside the Google Books Algorithm - Alexis Madrigal - Technology - The Atlantic

Google Books goes far beyond page ranking

Rich Results is the latest in a series of smaller front-end tweaks that have been matched by backend improvements. Now, the book search algorithm takes into account more than 100 "signals," individual data categories that Google statistically integrates to rank your results. When you search for a book, Google Books doesn't just look at word frequency or how closely your query matches the title of a book. They now take into account web search frequency, recent book sales, the number of libraries that hold the title, and how often an older book has been reprinted.

Inside the Google Books Algorithm - Alexis Madrigal - Technology - The Atlantic

Thursday, September 09, 2010

The trouble with Google Books - Google - Salon.com

Check the link below for a timely and balanced metadata management reality check (via Really Strategies Blog)

But everyone seems to agree that Google Book Search represents a revolutionary boon to scholars, especially people embarked on specialized research but without ready access to a university library. But is it? As UC-Berkeley professor Geoffrey Nunberg pointed out in an article for the Chronicle of Higher Education last year (expanded from a post on the blog Language Log), a research library is only as useful as the tools required to extract its riches. And there are some serious problems with the bibliographic information attached to many of the digital texts in Google Books.

Nunberg, a linguist interested in how word usage changes over time, noticed "endemic" errors in Google Books, especially when it comes to publication dates. A search for books published before 1950 and containing the word "Internet" turned up the unlikely bounty of 527 results. Woody Allen is mentioned in 325 books ostensibly published before he was born.

The trouble with Google Books - Google - Salon.com

Thursday, February 18, 2010

Google Book Settlement Hearing Could Be a Marathon - Digits - WSJ

A milestone review starts today

Judge Denny Chin has given 28 parties five minutes each to speak. Twenty-three of those–including Microsoft, Amazon.com, AT&T and the French Republic–are scheduled to speak in opposition. The objectors are a diverse crew, including privacy watchdogs, corporate giants and lawyers speaking on behalf of Arlo Guthrie, science fiction writers and the State of Connecticut. Five, including Sony Electronics Inc. and the Center of Democracy & Technology, are expected to voice their support.

After that, Judge Chin is expected to hand the microphone to the Justice Department, which has encouraged the court not to approve the deal. The Department told the court earlier this month that even after some revisions, the settlement takes too much liberty with the class-action mechanism and could stifle competition. Representatives for Google, the Authors Guild and the Association of American Publishers will wrap up the scheduled remarks.

Google Book Settlement Hearing Could Be a Marathon - Digits - WSJ

Friday, February 05, 2010

U.S. Voices Concerns on Google Book Settlement - WSJ.com

Not looking likely, at current course and speed

The department said Thursday that a "properly structured" agreement could offer important benefits to society, but it said that Google, the Authors Guild and the Association of American Publishers were still trying to reach too broadly with their proposed class-action settlement.

The revised settlement "suffers from the same core problem as the original agreement: it is an attempt to use the class action mechanism to implement forward-looking business arrangements that go far beyond the dispute ... in this litigation," the department said.

U.S. District Court Judge Denny Chin in New York, who must decide whether to approve the settlement, is scheduled to hold a Feb. 18 fairness hearing on the agreement.

U.S. Voices Concerns on Google Book Settlement - WSJ.com