Showing posts with label Cyberforensics. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Cyberforensics. Show all posts

Monday, February 22, 2010

FT.com / US & Canada - US experts close in on Google hackers

More developments in the Google/China context

Beyond the immediate forensic inquiry, the work of US researchers sheds light on how cyber-operations are conducted in China.

The man who wrote code to take advantage of the browser flaw is not a full-time government worker, did not launch the attack, and in fact would prefer not be used in such offensive efforts, according to the US team that discovered his role.

“If he wants to do the research he’s good at, he has to toe the line now and again,” the US analyst said. “He would rather not have uniformed guys looking over his shoulder, but there is no way anyone of his skill level can get away from that kind of thing. The state has privileged access to these researchers’ work.”

FT.com / US & Canada - US experts close in on Google hackers

Tuesday, May 12, 2009

Tracking Cyberspies Through the Web Wilderness - NYTimes.com

Read the full article for a timely reality check

Cyberforensics presents immense technical challenges that are complicated by the fact that the Internet effortlessly spans both local and national government boundaries. It is possible for a criminal, for example, to conceal his or her activities by connecting to a target computer through a string of innocent computers, each connected to the Internet on different continents, making law enforcement investigations time consuming or even impossible.

The most vexing issue facing both law enforcement and other cyberspace investigators is this question of “attribution.” The famous New Yorker magazine cartoon in which a dog sits at a computer keyboard and points out to a companion, “on the Internet, nobody knows you’re a dog,” is no joke for cyberdetectives.

To deal with the challenge, the Toronto researchers are pursuing what they describe as a fusion methodology, in which they look at Internet data in the context of real world events.

Tracking Cyberspies Through the Web Wilderness - NYTimes.com